What Is The Impact Of Arteriosclerosis Quizlet

What is the impact of arteriosclerosis?, These plaques cause the arteries to harden and narrow, restricting the blood flow and oxygen supply to vital organs, and increasing the risk of blood clots that could potentially block the flow of blood to the heart or brain.

Furthermore, What is the impact of arteriosclerosis a inefficient blood flow?, Explanation: Arteriosclerosis is the hardening of arteries, sometimes because of plaque or fatty buildups and blockages. This restricts blood flow and could trigger a heart attack or stroke.

Finally,  What is arteriosclerosis quizlet?, Arteriosclerosis (def) characterized by thickening, reduced elasticity and calcification of the arterial wall.

Frequently Asked Question:

What is atherosclerosis caused by quizlet?

Atherosclerosis refers to the buildup of fats, cholesterol and other substances in and on your artery walls (plaques), which can restrict blood flow. These plaques can burst, triggering a blood clot.

What causes atherosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis is thickening or hardening of the arteries caused by a buildup of plaque in the inner lining of an artery. Risk factors may include high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, obesity, physical activity, and eating saturated fats.

What is atherosclerosis quizlet?

Atherosclerosis definition. it is hardening of the arteries. It is due to progressive accumulation of smooth muscle cells, lipids and connective tissue within the INTIMA. It is a generic term for 3 patterns of vascular disease which have same result.

What is the most common cause of arteriosclerosis quizlet?

Malignant hypertension is the main cause.

What means atherosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis is the buildup of fats, cholesterol and other substances in and on your artery walls. This buildup is called plaque. The plaque can cause your arteries to narrow, blocking blood flow. The plaque can also burst, leading to a blood clot.

What is the main cause of arteriosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis happens when the endothelium becomes damaged, due to factors such as smoking, high blood pressure, or high levels of glucose, fat, and cholesterol in the blood. This damage allows a collection of substances, known as plaque, to build up in the artery wall. These substances include fat and cholesterol.

What organ does arteriosclerosis mainly affect?

Atherosclerosis can affect the medium-sized and large arteries of the brain, heart, kidneys, other vital organs, and legs. It is the most important and most common type of arteriosclerosis.

How do you live with atherosclerosis?

Take these steps for living healthy after being diagnosed with atherosclerosis:

  1. Stop or refrain from smoking. Smoking cigarettes makes it more likely that fatty deposits will form in your arteries. …
  2. Know your cholesterol and blood pressure. …
  3. Get on a heart-healthy diet. …
  4. Make fitness your goal. …
  5. Strive for weight loss.

What are the warning signs of arteriosclerosis?

What are the symptoms of atherosclerosis?

  • chest pain or angina.
  • pain in your leg, arm, and anywhere else that has a blocked artery.
  • shortness of breath.
  • fatigue.
  • confusion, which occurs if the blockage affects circulation to your brain.
  • muscle weakness in your legs from lack of circulation.

What are two of the hallmark signs of atherosclerosis?

If you have atherosclerosis in the arteries leading to your brain, you may have signs and symptoms such as sudden numbness or weakness in your arms or legs, difficulty speaking or slurred speech, temporary loss of vision in one eye, or drooping muscles in your face.

How do you test for arteriosclerosis?

Doctors have an arsenal of diagnostic tests and tools they can access to confirm the presence of Atherosclerosis – these include an angiogram (Arteriogram), cholesterol tests, a chest x-ray, a CT (computed tomography) scan, Duplex scanning, an echocardiogram, an electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG), an exercise stress test ( …

What are the 4 stages of atherosclerosis?

These stages do not necessarily occur in order, nor is there always a progression from one stage to the next.

  • The fatty streak. The “fatty streak” appears as a yellow streak running inside the walls of the major arteries, such as the aorta. …
  • The plaque. …
  • Stable and unstable plaque. …
  • Blocked artery. …
  • Response-to-injury.

What is the best treatment for atherosclerosis?

Lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising, are the first treatment for atherosclerosis — and may be all that you need to treat your atherosclerosis.

Surgery or other procedures

  • Angioplasty and stent placement. …
  • Endarterectomy. …
  • Fibrinolytic therapy. …
  • Coronary artery bypass surgery.

Related conditions

If you have atherosclerosis in the arteries leading to your brain, you may have signs and symptoms such as sudden numbness or weakness in your arms or legs, difficulty speaking or slurred speech, temporary loss of vision in one eye, or drooping muscles in your face.

Who is most affected by atherosclerosis?

Generally, women over age 55 and men over age 45 are at greatest risk for developing atherosclerosis. The risk of cardiovascular events increases with age.

Where does atherosclerosis most commonly occur?

Atherosclerosis occurs in elastic and muscular arteries and may occur iatrogenically in vein grafts interposed in the arterial circulation. The aorta is affected earliest, followed by the carotid arteries, coronary arteries, and iliofemoral arteries.

What vessels are mainly affected by atherosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis can affect the medium-sized and large arteries of the brain, heart, kidneys, other vital organs, and legs. It is the most important and most common type of arteriosclerosis.